Voivodships of Poland

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Updates: 

The 2010 version of the NUTS standard shows a new set of subregions, with newly assigned NUTS codes. The codes for regions and voivodships remain unchanged.

I have added new population data from the 2011 census, and previous censuses. The data were provided by Valentin Arzoumanian and Sorin Cosoveanu.

ISO 3166-2 Newsletter II-3 is dated 2011-12-15. It merely changes the sort order of the divisions of Poland.

FIPS PUB 10-4 is the U.S. Federal standard for administrative divisions of countries. Change 2 to FIPS PUB 10-4 is dated 1999-03-01. This change recognizes the reorganization of Poland that took effect on 1998-07-27. Update I-1 to ISO 3166-2 was published on 2000-06-21. It also shows the revised list of voivodships from 1998. The FIPS and ISO codes for the current divisions of Poland are shown in the table below.

Country overview: 

Short namePOLAND
ISO codePL
FIPS codePL
LanguagePolish (pl)
Time zone+1~
CapitalWarsaw

 

In 1900, historical Poland was entirely subjected to other nations. The area that is now Poland was split among the German, Russian, and Austro-Hungarian Empires. At the end of World War I, the Poles proclaimed a republic which was then validated by the Versailles Treaty. As World War II began, Germany and the Soviet Union overran the country from opposite sides to the middle. In the settlements ending the war, Poland was reconstituted. As compared to the interbellum period, it gained territory in the west from Germany, but lost territory in the east to the Soviet Union. It remained independent, but under the hegemony of the Soviet Union, until the Iron Curtain fell in 1989.

Other names of country: 

  1. Danish: Polen
  2. Dutch: Polen, Republiek Polen (formal)
  3. English: Polish Republic (formal)
  4. Finnish: Puola
  5. French: Pologne f
  6. German: Polen n
  7. Hungarian: Lengyelország
  8. Icelandic: Pólland
  9. Italian: Polonia f
  10. Norwegian: Polen, Republikken Polen (formal)
  11. Polish: Polska, Rzeczpospolita Polska (formal)
  12. Portuguese: Polónia, Polônia f (Brazil), República f da Polónia f (formal)
  13. Russian: Республика Польша (formal)
  14. Spanish: Polonia, República f Polaca (formal)
  15. Swedish: Polen
  16. Turkish: Polonya Cumhuriyeti (formal)

Origin of name: 

from ethnic name Polane, from Slavic pole: field

Primary subdivisions: 

Poland is divided into sixteen wojewodztwa (voivodships).

VoivodshipHASCFIPSNUTSPop-2011Pop-2002Pop-1988Area(km.²)Area(mi.²)CapitalFormer
DolnośląskiePL.DSPL72PL512,915,2382,907,2122,948,21219,9477,701WrocławJelenia Góra, Legnica, Wałbrzych, Wrocław
Kujawsko-pomorskiePL.KPPL73PL612,097,6342,069,3212,044,04917,9716,939BydgoszczBydgoszcz, Toruń, Włocławek
ŁódzkiePL.LDPL74PL112,538,6772,612,8902,703,69818,2197,034ŁódźŁódź, Piotrków, Sieradz, Skierniewice
LubelskiePL.LUPL75PL312,175,7002,199,0542,209,22125,1229,700LublinBiała Podlaska, Chełm, Lublin, Zamość
LubuskiePL.LBPL76PL431,022,8431,008,954982,68413,9885,401Gorzów WielkopolskiGorzów, Zielona Góra
MałopolskiePL.MAPL77PL213,337,4713,240,7303,088,45815,1835,862KrakówKraków, Nowy Sącz, Tarnów
MazowieckiePL.MZPL78PL125,268,6605,124,0184,997,84535,55813,729WarszawaCiechanów, Ostrołęka, Płock, Radom, Siedlce, Warszawa
OpolskiePL.OPPL79PL521,016,2131,065,0431,080,7019,4123,634OpoleOpole
PodkarpackiePL.PKPL80PL322,127,2852,095,5152,010,71417,8466,890RzeszówKrosno, Przemyśl, Rzeszów, Tarnobrzeg
PodlaskiePL.PDPL81PL341,202,3651,208,6061,188,54720,1877,794BiałystokBiałystok, Łomża
PomorskiePL.PMPL82PL632,276,1762,179,9002,095,14718,3107,070GdańskElbląg, Gdańsk, Słupsk
ŚląskiePL.SLPL83PL224,630,3644,742,8744,915,21012,3334,762KatowiceBielsko-Biała, Częstochowa, Katowice
ŚwiętokrzyskiePL.SKPL84PL331,280,7271,297,4771,317,44111,7114,521KielceKielce
Warmińsko-mazurskiePL.WNPL85PL621,452,1471,428,3571,397,99724,1739,333OlsztynOlsztyn, Suwałki
WielkopolskiePL.WPPL86PL413,447,4413,351,9153,236,61829,82711,516PoznańKalisz, Konin, Leszno, Piła, Poznań
ZachodniopomorskiePL.ZPPL87PL421,722,8831,698,2141,662,56322,8928,839SzczecinKoszalin, Szczecin
16 voivodships38,511,82438,230,08037,879,105312,680120,726
  • HASC: Hierarchical administrative subdivision codes. If periods are replaced by hyphens,
    these are the same as the voivodship codes from ISO standard 3166-2.
  • FIPS: Codes from FIPS PUB 10-4, a U.S. government standard.
  • NUTS: Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics.
  • Pop-2011: 2011-03-21 census.
  • Pop-2002: 2002-05-20 census.
  • Pop-1988: 1988-12-06 census (proleptic).
  • Former: Former provinces included in the new province. In most cases, provincial boundaries have
    changed. I listed each old province under the new province that contains its
    capital and the greater part of its territory, as far as I could determine.

Postal codes: 

Poland uses five-digit postal codes, with a hyphen between the second and third digits. The codes don't correlate well with voivodship boundaries.

Further subdivisions:

See the Counties of Poland page.

Poland is divided into 16 województwa (sing. województwo: voivodships or provinces). The voivodships are divided into 308 powiaty (sing. powiat: districts, counties) and 65 cities of county right, sometimes referred to as rural districts and urban districts. These are subdivided into miasta (towns), which are further subdivided into gminy (sing. gmina: communes, wards). The powiaty were abolished in 1975, but reinstated in 1998.

Poland has also been divided into arbitrary NUTS-1 regions (regiony) and NUTS-3 subregions (podregiony) for statistical purposes. The NUTS scheme is hierarchical. The first four characters of a subregion code indicate which voivodship the subregion belongs to, and the first three characters of a voivodship code indicate which region the voivodship belongs to. Here are lists of these codes.

NUTS-1Region
PL1Centralny
PL4Północno-zachodni
PL6Północny
PL5Południowo-zachodni
PL2Południowy
PL3Wschodni

 

NUTS-3Subregion
PL343Białostocki
PL311Bialski
PL225Bielski
PL613Bydgosko-Toruński
PL228Bytomski
PL312Chełmsko-zamojski
PL121Ciechanowsko-płocki
PL224Częstochowski
PL621Elbląski
PL623Ełcki
PL634Gdański
PL229Gliwicki
PL431Gorzowski
PL614Grudziądzki
PL515Jeleniogórski
PL416Kaliski
PL22AKatowicki
PL331Kielecki
PL414Koniński
PL422Koszaliński
PL214Krakowski
PL323Krośnieński
PL516Legnicko-Głogowski
PL417Leszczyński
PL114Łódzki
PL344Łomżyński
PL314Lubelski
PL213Miasto Kraków
PL113Miasto Łódź
PL415Miasto Poznań
PL424Miasto Szczecin
PL127Miasto Warszawa
PL514Miasto Wrocław
PL215Nowosądecki
PL521Nyski
PL622Olsztyński
PL522Opolski
PL122Ostrołęcko-siedlecki
PL216Oświęcimski
PL411Pilski
PL115Piotrkowski
PL418Poznański
PL324Przemyski
PL315Puławski
PL128Radomski
PL227Rybnicki
PL325Rzeszowski
PL332Sandomiersko-jędrzejowski
PL116Sieradzki
PL117Skierniewicki
PL631Słupski
PL22BSosnowiecki
PL423Stargardzki
PL635Starogardzki
PL345Suwalski
PL425Szczeciński
PL326Tarnobrzeski
PL217Tarnowski
PL633Trójmiejski
PL22CTyski
PL517Wałbrzyski
PL129Warszawski-wschodni
PL12AWarszawski-zachodni
PL615Włocławski
PL518Wrocławski
PL432Zielonogórski

Territorial extent: 

Zachodniopomorskie contains the Polish part of Uznam Island (German name: Usedom).

Origins of names of former provinces:

  1. Białystok: Polish biały: white, stok: river
  2. Bydgoszcz: Indo-European bredahe: swampy water
  3. Elbląg: from Old Norwegian elf: river
  4. Gdańsk: from Gothic Gutisk-andja: end of the Goths (Gdynia likewise)
  5. Jelenia Góra: Polish jelen: stag, gora: mountain (cf. German name, from Hirsch: stag, Berg: mountain)
  6. Kraków: man's name Krak, legendary founder of city
  7. Zielona Góra: Polish zielona: green, gora: mountain (cf. German name, from grün: green, Berg: mountain)

Change history: 

  1. 1815-05-03: Congress of Vienna created the Kingdom of Poland (sometimes called Congress Poland) and made it a semi-autonomous part of the Russian Empire.
  2. 1861: Administrative reform in the Russian Empire divided Congress Poland into ten guberniy, or provinces. Their Russian names (transliterated) were Kalish, Kel'tsy, Lomzha, Lyublin, Petrokov, Plotsk, Radom, Sedlets, Suvalki, and Varshava.
  3. In 1900, the area corresponding to modern Poland belonged to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, the German Empire, and the Russian Empire. The Austro-Hungarian Empire consisted of Austria (Cisleithania) and Hungary (Transleithania); Austria, in turn, was divided into provinces, parts of two of which (Galicia and Silesia) are now in Poland. The German-owned section of modern Poland lay within two states of the German Empire: the Kingdom of Prussia (Brandenburg, East Prussia, Pomerania, Posen, Silesia, and West Prussia provinces) and the Kingdom of Saxony (Bautzen province). The Russian part consisted of most of the Kingdom of Poland, and part of the guberniya of Grodno.
  4. 1912: Kholm (Polish Chelm) guberniya formed from parts of Lyublin and Sedlets.
  5. 1919-06-28: Treaty of Versailles signed. Poland's independence, which it had proclaimed on 1918-11-09, was recognized. Poland comprised most of Posen and West Prussia provinces from Germany, the Kingdom of Poland from Russia, and Galicia from Austria. Galicia was in fact divided into East and West Galicia. West Galicia became fully part of Poland; East Galicia was mandated to Poland but a plebiscite was planned for it. Germany retained East Prussia and a small section of West Prussia, an exclave separated from the rest of Germany by the "Polish Corridor." A 1,893-km.² section on the West Prussian Baltic shore around Danzig (Gdańsk) became the Free City of Danzig (Freie Stadt Danzig). The provisional border between Poland and Russia was the Curzon Line, soon wiped from the map in the Russo-Polish War (1919-20), which also gave Poland full sovereignty in East Galicia.
  6. 1920-10-07: Poland occupied the southeastern part of Vilna, including the city of Vilnius.
  7. 1921-03-18: Poland and Russia signed the Riga Treaty, dividing Byelorussia between them. Poland gained Grodno, most of Vilna, the western part of Volhynia, and a western fringe of Minsk. Brest-Litovsk was renamed to Brzešč nad Bugiem.
  8. 1921-05-21: Plebiscite held in most of Upper Silesia (part of Silesia province, Prussia). A few eastern cantons voted for union with Poland, which took place in 1922. The divisions of Poland at this time were the former Prussian Bezirke (districts) of Bydgoszcz (Bromberg), Gdansk (Danzig), Kwidzyn (Marienwerder), and Poznan (Posen); the guberniy of Russian Poland, Kalisz (Kalish), Kielce (Kel'tsy), Łomża (Lomzha), Lublin (Lyublin), Piotrkow (Petrokov), Płock (Plotsk), Radom, Siedlce (Sedlets), Suwalki (Suvalki), and Warszawa (Varshava); the conquered sections of the West Russian guberniy of Grodno, Minsk, Vilna, and Wolyń (Volhynia); and Kraków (West Galicia) and Lwów (East Galicia). Names in parentheses are the prewar names of these divisions.
  9. 1939-09-01: Germany invaded Poland, igniting World War II. The Soviet Union invaded Poland on 1939-09-17. By 1939-09-21, Poland had been divided between Germany and the Soviet Union. Germany also annexed the Free City of Danzig, which it renamed Hanseatic City of Danzig (Hansestadt Danzig) in 1940.
  10. 1939-10-10: Over half of the Polish territory in Vilna guberniya restored to Lithuania.
  11. 1945-07-16: Potsdam Conference began. It transferred large parts of the German provinces of Pomerania, Brandenburg, Silesia, East and West Prussia to Poland, except that the northern part of East Prussia became Kaliningrad Oblast of Russia. The new western border of Poland was called the Oder-Neisse Line, as it generally followed the course of the Oder and Neisse Rivers. A small area east of Ostrava was transferred from Poland to Czechoslovakia, splitting in two the city known as Cieszyn in Polish, Těšín in Czech, and Teschen in German. The Soviet Union recovered territory lost in the Russo-Polish War up to approximately the Curzon Line, annexing it to the republics of Byelorussia, Lithuania, and Ukraine. By 1946, Poland was organized into fourteen voivodships and two independent cities on the same administrative level as a voivodship. Boundaries were redrawn, so the correspondence is only fair, but Mazury is roughly East Prussia; Śląsk Dabrowski and Śląsk Dolny roughly match Silesia; Pomorze Zachodnie roughly matches Pomerania; and the Free City of Danzig merged with the new Gdańsk voivodship.
VoivodshipPopulationArea(km.²)Capital
Białystok917,60022,551Białystok
Gdańsk732,10010,725Sopot
Kielce1,717,30018,052Kielce
Kraków2,133,40015,918Kraków
Łódź1,772,40020,233Łódź
Łódź [City]496,900212Łódź
Lublin1,889,70027,741Lublin
Mazury351,80019,319Olsztyn
Pomorze1,406,50020,028Bydgoszcz
Pomorze Zachodnie892,60030,251Szczecin
Poznań2,422,10039,243Poznań
Rzeszów1,535,40018,200Rzeszów
Śląsk Dabrowski2,823,40015,369Katowice
Śląsk Dolny1,941,10024,740Wrocław
Warszawa2,114,40029,000Pruszków
Warszawa [City]478,800140Warszawa
16 divisions23,929,800311,722
  • Population: 1946 census
  1. ~1949: Name of Mazury changed to Olsztyn; name of Pomorze changed to Bydgoszcz; name of Pomorze Zachodnie changed to Szczecin; name of Śląsk Dabrowski changed to Śląsk; name of Śląsk Dolny changed to Wrocław.
  2. ~1955: Koszalin voivodship formed from parts of Bydgoszcz, Gdańsk, and Szczecin; Śląsk voivodship split into Katowice and Opole (with small annexations from Kielce and Wrocław); Zielona Góra voivodship formed from parts of Poznań and Wrocław; Kraków, Poznań, and Wrocław independent cities split from the voivodships of the same names; other border adjustments made; capital of Warszawa voivodship moved from Pruszków to Warszawa (Warsaw). After these changes, the list of voivodships was:
VoivodshipPopulationArea(km.²)Became
Białystok1,177,00023,167Białystok, Łomża, Suwałki
Bydgoszcz1,871,00020,973Bydgoszcz, Piła, Toruń, Włocławek
Gdańsk1,393,00010,924Elbląg, Gdańsk, Słupsk
Katowice3,585,0009,389Bielsko-Biała, Częstochowa, Katowice
Kielce1,910,00019,258Częstochowa, Kielce, Piotrków, Radom, Tarnobrzeg
Koszalin774,00017,774Koszalin, Piła, Słupsk
Kraków2,159,00015,408Bielsko-Biała, Katowice, Kielce, Kraków, Nowy Sącz, Tarnów
Kraków City540,200230Kraków
Łódź1,675,00016,710Łódź, Piotrków, Płock, Sieradz, Skierniewice
Łódź City750,400212Łódź
Lublin1,920,00025,047Biała Podlaska, Chełm, Lublin, Siedlce, Tarnobrzeg, Zamość
Olsztyn973,00021,020Elbląg, Olsztyn, Suwałki, Toruń
Opole1,027,0009,532Katowice, Opole
Poznań2,159,00027,224Kalisz, Konin, Leszno, Piła, Poznań
Poznań City446,700219Poznań
Rzeszów1,720,00018,639Krosno, Przemyśl, Rzeszów, Tarnobrzeg, Tarnów
Szczecin872,00012,744Gorzów, Szczecin
Warszawa2,483,00029,080Ciechanów, Ostrołęka, Płock, Radom, Siedlce, Skierniewice, Warszawa
Warszawa City1,282,600427Warszawa
Wrocław1,994,00018,808Jelenia Góra, Legnica, Leszno, Wrocław, Wałbrzych
Wrocław City487,000225Wrocław
Zielona Góra866,00014,720Gorzów, Legnica, Leszno, Zielona Góra
22 divisions32,064,900311,730
  • Voivodships: except for those whose name says "City," which are independent cities.
  • Population: 1972 estimate
  • Capital: Name of capital is the same as that of voivodship.
  • Became: List of post-1975 voivodships having significant territory in common with this division.
  1. 1975-06-01: Administrative reform changed the seventeen voivodships into the 49 listed below, and eliminated the districts. There were also three cities with voivodship status (Kraków, Łódź, and Warszawa). In most sources, these three cities are included in the voivodships of the same names.
VoivodshipISOFIPSPopulationArea(km.²)Area(mi.²)AdjectivalGerman
Biała PodlaskaBPPL23304,5005,3482,065bialskopodlaskie
BiałystokBKPL24690,30010,0553,882białostockie
Bielsko-BiałaBBPL25895,3003,7041,430bielskieBielitz
BydgoszczBYPL261,106,60010,3493,996bydgoskieBromberg
ChełmCHPL27246,2003,8661,493chełmskieCholm
CiechanówCIPL28427,0006,3622,456ciechanowskie
CzęstochowaCZPL29776,1006,1822,387częstochowskieTschenstochau
ElblągELPL30476,6006,1032,356elbląskieElbing
GdańskGDPL311,423,3007,3942,855gdańskieDanzig
GorzówGOPL32498,3008,4843,276gorzowskieLandsberg
Jelenia GóraJGPL33517,0004,3781,690jeleniogórskieHirschberg
KaliszKLPL34708,3006,5122,514kaliskieKalisch
KatowiceKAPL353,968,3006,6502,568katowickieKattowitz
KielceKIPL361,126,0009,2113,556kieleckie
KoninKNPL37467,6005,1391,984konińskie
KoszalinKOPL38504,2008,4703,270koszalińskieKöslin
KrakówKRPL391,227,8003,2541,256krakowskieKrakau
KrosnoKSPL40491,8005,7022,202krośnieńskie
LegnicaLGPL41512,0004,0371,559legnickieLiegnitz
LesznoLEPL42384,5004,1541,604leszczyńskieLissa
ŁódźLDPL431,142,7001,523588łódzkie
ŁomżaLOPL44345,6006,6842,581łomżyńskie
LublinLUPL451,013,4006,7922,622lubelskie
Nowy SączNSPL46692,2005,5762,153nowosądeckieNeusandez
OlsztynOLPL47748,50012,3274,759olsztyńskieAllenstein
OpoleOPPL481,014,9008,5353,295opolskieOppeln
OstrołękaOSPL49395,0006,4982,509ostrołęckie
PiłaPIPL50478,0008,2053,168pilskieSchneidemühl
PiotrkówPTPL51642,0006,2662,419piotrkowskiePetrikau
PłockPLPL52515,4005,1171,976płockie
PoznańPOPL531,327,9008,1513,147poznańskiePosen
PrzemyślPRPL54405,1004,4371,713przemyskie
RadomRAPL55748,3007,2942,816radomskie
RzeszówRZPL56717,4004,3971,698rzeszowskie
SiedlceSEPL57649,3008,4993,281siedleckie
SieradzSIPL58408,0004,8691,880sieradzkie
SkierniewiceSKPL59418,2003,9601,529skierniewickie
SłupskSLPL60410,4007,4532,878słupskieStolp
SuwałkiSUPL61466,30010,4904,050suwalskie
SzczecinSZPL62967,3009,9813,854szczecińskieStettin
TarnobrzegTGPL63596,4006,2832,426tarnobrzeskie
TarnówTAPL64666,0004,1511,603tarnowskie
ToruńTOPL65655,7005,3482,065toruńskieThorn
WałbrzychWBPL66741,2004,1681,609wałbrzyskieWaldenburg
WarszawaWAPL672,419,1003,7881,463warszawskieWarschau
WłocławekWLPL68428,9004,4021,700włocławskie
WrocławWRPL691,126,3006,2872,427wrocławskieBreslau
ZamośćZAPL70489,8006,9802,695zamojskie
Zielona GóraZGPL71657,4008,8683,424zielonogórskieGrünberg
49 divisions38,038,400312,683120,727
  • ISO: Codes from ISO 3166-2.
  • FIPS: Codes from FIPS PUB 10-4.
  • Population: 1989 census
  • Area(km.²): Square kilometers
  • Area(mi.²): Square miles
  • Adjectival: In Polish text, the voivodship name will often appear in this adjectival form.
  • German: German name of capital; used officially for province during periods of
    German occupation.
  • Capitals: Voivodships had the same names as their capitals, except for Gorzów
    (capital, Gorzów Wielkopolski) and Piotrków (Piotrków Trybunalski).
  1. 1998-07-27: President Kwaśniewski signed a bill reorganizing Poland from 49 voivodships to sixteen. Subsequently, on 1998-08-07, the subdivision of the country into 308 counties (powiaty), plus 65 cities with county rights, was decided. The new divisions were implemented on 1999-01-01.
  2. 2004-05-01: Poland joined the European Union.

Other names of subdivisions:

  1. Dolnośląskie: Lower Silesia (rough English equivalent)
  2. Małopolskie: Little Poland (rough English equivalent)
  3. Mazowieckie: Masovian (rough English equivalent)
  4. Podkarpackie: Subcarpathian (rough English equivalent)
  5. Pomorskie: Pomerania (rough English equivalent)
  6. Śląskie: Silesia (rough English equivalent)
  7. Świętokrzyskie: Holy Cross (rough English equivalent)
  8. Wielkopolskie: Greater Poland (rough English equivalent)
  9. Zachodniopomorskie: Western Pomerania (rough English equivalent)

Former subdivisions:

  1. Gdańsk: Dantzig (French); Danzica (Italian); Danzig (obsolete)
  2. Kraków: Cracovia (Italian, Spanish); Cracóvia (Portuguese); Cracovie (French); Cracow (variant); Krakova (Finnish)
  3. Łódź (Polish); Lodsch (German); Lodz (English, German-variant)
  4. Lublin: Lublino (Italian); Люблин (Russian)
  5. Poznań: Posen (German)
  6. Szczecin: Stettin (English, German); Stettino (Italian)
  7. Warszawa: Stołeczne Warszawskie (formal); Varsavia (Italian); Varsova (Finnish); Varsovia (Spanish); Varsóvia (Portuguese); Varsovie (French); Warsaw (variant); Варшава (Russian)
  8. Wrocław: Breslavia (Italian)

Sources: 

  1. [1] Eastern Europe and the Commonwealth of Independent States 1992. Europa Publications Ltd., London, 1992.
  2. [2] Concise Statistical Yearbook of Poland 1991. Central Statistical Office, Warsaw, 1992.
  3. [3] Ludność w gminach  (Population in municipalities). Central Statistical Office (retrieved 2013-01-12).
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