Departments of Uruguay

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Updates: 

The ever-alert Sorin Cosoveanu has reported that the final results of the 2011 census are posted. You will find them below.

The Instituto Nacional de Estatística has posted census results on its website. They are described as "Definitive Data from Census Phase I - 2004 (revised to 2005-04-25)". I wasn't able to find an "as of" date for the population data. As a result, I'm not sure whether the 2005-04-25 revision date represents population projections, or just the date when the INE finished tabulating the data.

Country overview: 

Short nameURUGUAY
ISO codeUY
FIPS codeUY
LanguageSpanish (es)
Time zone-3 ~
CapitalMontevideo

 

Uruguay has been independent throughout the 20th century.

Other names of country: 

  1. Danish: Uruguay
  2. Dutch: Uruguay, Oostelijke Republiek Uruguay (formal)
  3. English: Eastern Republic of Uruguay (formal)
  4. Finnish: Uruguay
  5. French: Uruguay m
  6. German: Uruguay, Republik f Östlich des Uruguay n (formal)
  7. Icelandic: Úrúgvæ
  8. Italian: Uruguay m
  9. Norwegian: Uruguay, Republikken Uruguay (formal)
  10. Portuguese: Uruguai, República f Oriental do Uruguai m (formal)
  11. Russian: Восточная Республика Уругвай (formal)
  12. Spanish: Uruguay, República f Oriental del Uruguay m (formal)
  13. Swedish: Uruguay
  14. Turkish: Uruguay, Uruguay Doğu Cumhuriyeti (formal)

Origin of name: 

possibly from irugua: chief channel + y: river, or Guarani uru: bird, huguay: tail (one source interprets the name as "river of the beautifully colored birds")

Primary subdivisions: 

Uruguay is divided into nineteen departamentos (departments).

DepartmentHASCFIPSPopulationArea(km.²)Area(mi.²)CapitalPc
Artigas UY.ARUY0173,378 11,9284,605Artigas55
Canelones UY.CAUY02520,187 4,5361,751Canelones90
Cerro Largo UY.CLUY0384,698 13,6485,270Melo37
Colonia UY.COUY04123,203 6,1062,358Colonia (del Sacramento)70
Durazno UY.DUUY0557,088 11,6434,495Durazno97
Flores UY.FSUY0625,050 5,1441,986Trinidad85
Florida UY.FDUY0767,048 10,4174,022Florida94
Lavalleja UY.LAUY0858,815 10,0163,867Minas30
Maldonado UY.MAUY09164,300 4,7931,851Maldonado20
Montevideo UY.MOUY101,319,108530205Montevideo10
Paysandú UY.PAUY11113,124 13,9225,375Paysandú60
Río Negro UY.RNUY1254,765 9,2823,584Fray Bentos65
Rivera UY.RVUY13103,493 9,3703,618Rivera40
Rocha UY.ROUY1468,088 10,5514,074Rocha27
Salto UY.SAUY15124,878 14,1635,468Salto50
San José UY.SJUY16108,309 4,9921,927San José (de Mayo)80
Soriano UY.SOUY1782,595 9,0003,475Mercedes75
Tacuarembó UY.TAUY1890,053 15,4385,961Tacuarembó45
Treinta y TresUY.TTUY1948,134 9,5293,679Treinta y Tres33
19 departments 3,286,314175,00867,571
  • ISO: Codes from ISO 3166-2.
  • FIPS: Codes from FIPS PUB 10-4.
  • Population: 2011-09-01 census
  • Capital: The informal name is the part not in parentheses.
  • Pc: Uruguay uses five-digit códigos postales. The numbers given in the table
    are the first two digits for each department. Treinta y Tres was well chosen.

Territorial extent: 

The departments of Colonia, Flores, San José, and Soriano appear to meet in a single point.

Origins of names: 

  1. Artigas: From its capital city, named after José Gervasio Artigas (1764-1850), revolutionary leader.
  2. Canelones: Spanish canelón, augmentative of canal: channel. Canelón Grande and Canelón Chico flow through the department.
  3. Cerro Largo: Spanish cerro: hill, largo: long.
  4. Colonia: From its capital city, Colonia del Sacramento, named for its colonial history.
  5. Durazno: From its capital city, named for a strategic pass with a lone peach tree (Spanish durazno).
  6. Flores: For General Venancio Flores (1808-1868).
  7. Florida: From its capital city, originally (1809) named San Fernando de la Florida, after King Fernando VII of Spain and the Count of Florida Blanca.
  8. Lavalleja: For Juan Antonio Lavalleja (1784-1853), commander of the 33 patriots.
  9. Maldonado: After Lt. Francisco Maldonado, the local commander in 1530.
  10. Montevideo: Spanish monte: mountain + Latin video: I see.
  11. Paysandú: Possibly after missionary Policarpo Sandú, with Guaraní honorific paí.
  12. Rivera: For General Fructuoso Rivera (1784-1854), first president of Uruguay.
  13. Rocha: From its capital city, founded (1793) as Nuestra Señora de los Remedios de Rocha.
  14. Salto: For a waterfall (Spanish salto) on the Uruguay River, since impounded
  15. Soriano: From its capital city, founded (1793) as Santo Domingo Soriano
  16. Tacuarembó: From the river of that name, from Guaraní tacuá: (sugar) cane, îrembó: sprout.
  17. Treinta y Tres: Spanish for thirty-three, the number of patriots under Lavalleja who invaded from Buenos Aires, raised an army, and gained Uruguay's independence in 1825-1828.

Change history: 

  1. 1828-08-27: Uruguay divided by law into nine departamentos (departments): Canelones, Cerro Largo, Colonia, Durazno, Maldonado, Montevideo, Paysandú, San José, and Soriano.
  2. 1837-06-14: Minas department formed from parts of Cerro Largo and Maldonado; Salto and Tacuarembó departments split from Paysandú.
  3. 1856-07-10: Florida department split from San José.
  4. 1880-07-07: Río Negro department split from Paysandú; Rocha department split from Maldonado.
  5. 1884-09-20: Treinta y Tres department split from Maldonado.
  6. 1884-10-01: Artigas department split from Salto; Rivera department split from Tacuarembó.
  7. 1885-12-30: Flores department split from San José.
  8. 1927-12-22: Name of Minas department changed to Lavalleja.
  9. Source: "Uruguay y su Espacio: antecedentes y una propuesta", by Bernardo Quagliotti de Bellis and Victor Chamorro, Editorial Geosur, 1979.

Other names of subdivisions: 

Montevideo: Montevidéu (Portuguese)

Population history:

The Web site of the Instituto Nacional de Estadística (INE) has population figures that differ slightly from those in "Administrative Subdivisions of Countries" (except for 1985, which agrees perfectly). I would take the INE figures to be more authoritative.

Department190819111921?194119531963-10-161975-05-211985-10-231996-05-222004-06-012011-09-01
Artigas 26,321 31,380 43,996 55,748 63,589 52,843 57,947 69,145 75,059 78,019 73,378
Canelones 87,874 97,719 132,862 199,232 201,359 258,195 325,594 364,248 443,053 485,240 520,187
Cerro Largo 44,742 49,307 66,092 96,488 110,339 71,023 74,027 78,416 82,510 86,564 84,698
Colonia 54,644 63,732 97,811 129,322 135,038 105,350 111,832 112,717 120,241 119,266 123,203
Durazno 42,325 47,253 64,226 94,291 99,063 53,635 55,699 55,077 55,716 58,859 57,088
Flores 16,082 19,030 28,014 35,835 35,565 23,530 24,745 24,739 25,030 25,104 25,050
Florida 45,406 51,202 72,315 105,932 106,284 63,987 67,129 66,474 66,503 68,181 67,048
Lavalleja 51,222 33,168 78,984 115,181 115,852 65,823 65,180 61,466 61,085 60,925 58,815
Maldonado 28,820 57,036 48,085 66,539 67,933 61,259 76,211 94,314 127,502 140,192 164,300
Montevideo 309,231 338,125 422,499 536,533 836,165 1,202,7571,237,2271,311,9761,344,8391,325,9681,319,108
Paysandú 38,421 48,419 90,523 83,490 92,417 88,029 98,508 103,763 111,509 113,244 113,124
Río Negro 19,932 27,622 45,163 47,147 51,954 46,861 50,123 48,644 51,713 53,989 54,765
Rivera 35,683 39,413 52,442 74,746 91,740 77,086 82,043 89,475 98,472 104,921 103,493
Rocha 34,119 39,038 55,665 82,156 86,334 55,097 60,258 66,601 70,292 69,937 68,088
Salto 46,259 54,159 88,110 99,754 108,030 92,183 103,074 108,487 117,597 123,120 124,878
San José 46,324 51,785 69,759 97,301 96,848 79,563 88,000 89,893 96,664 103,104 108,309
Soriano 39,565 44,720 65,542 92,671 99,927 77,906 80,614 79,439 81,557 84,563 82,595
Tacuarembó 46,939 51,505 69,907 104,889 119,658 76,964 84,535 83,498 84,919 90,489 90,053
Treinta y Tres 28,777 32,897 48,219 68,371 72,063 43,419 45,683 46,869 49,502 49,318 48,134
Totals 1,042,6861,177,5101,640,2142,185,6262,590,1582,595,5102,788,4292,955,2413,163,7633,241,0033,286,314

Sources: 

  1. Population 1908: Anuario Estadístico 1909.
  2. Census 1911-12-31: The Statesman's Year-Book, 1913 edition.
  3. Census 1921?: Rand McNally World Atlas, Commonwealth Edition, 1928, census date not given but must be before 1926.
  4. Census 1941-1953: Official estimates.
  5. Census 1963-2005: Census documents from INE.
  6. [1] Quagliotti de Bellis, Bernardo, and Victor Chamorro, Uruguay y su Espacio: antecedentes y una propuesta. Editorial Geosur, 1979.
  7. [2] Library of Congress country study  (retrieved 1999).
  8. [3] Censos 2011 , Instituto Nacional de Estadística (retrieved 2012-08-18).
Back to main statoids page Last updated: 2012-08-18
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